Health

The mission of the Greene County Health Department is to Protect, Preserve and Enhance the public health of Greene County through a commitment to the principles of public health practice in our community.

Joy Brock, Director

227 Kingold Boulevard, Suite B
Snow Hill, NC 28580
Phone (252) 747-8183
Fax (252) 747-4040
Email joy.brock@greenecountync.gov
Be Sure to Like Us on Facebook - Greene County Department of Public Health

 

 

COVID-19 NC Information click here

 

COVID-19 Testing

Health Department's Press Releases:

08/10/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/05/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/03/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/27/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/20/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/15/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/14/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/07/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/06/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/01/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/23/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/18/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/16/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/15/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/12/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/09/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/04/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/03/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/21/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/19/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/18/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/14/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/11/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/06/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/04/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/01/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/23/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/13/2020 Daily Update (pm) - click here

4/13/2020 Daily Update (am) - click here

4/12/2020 Daily Update (pm) - click here

4/12/2020 Daily Update (am) - click here

4/9/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/8/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/7/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/6/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/2/2020 Press Release - click here

4/1/2020 Press Release - click here

3/26/2020 Press Release - click here

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 14, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov



North Carolina K-12 Public Schools to Require Key Safety Measures to

Allow In-person Instruction 

Districts may choose to conduct school entirely by remote learning

North Carolina will continue to pause in Safer At Home Phase 2 for three more weeks

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen were joined today by education and health leaders to announce health and safety plans for K-12 public schools for the new school year. Schools will open for in-person instruction under an updated Plan B that requires face coverings for all K-12 students, fewer children in the classroom, measures to ensure social distancing for everyone in the building, and other safety protocols. 

“The most important opening is that of our classroom doors. Our schools provide more than academics; they are vital to our children’s’ health, safety and emotional development,” said Governor Cooper. “This is a difficult time for families with hard choices on every side. I am committed to working together to ensure our students and educators are as safe as possible and that children have opportunities to learn in the way that is best for them and their families.” 

The Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit outlines the updated requirements for Plan B. Districts may choose to operate under Plan C, which calls for remote learning only, and health leaders recommend schools allow families to opt in to all-remote learning. Modifications have been made to Plan B since it was released in June to make it more protective of public health. 

“After looking at the current scientific evidence and weighing the risks and benefits, we have decided to move forward with today’s balanced, flexible approach which allows for in-person instruction as long as key safety requirements are in place in addition to remote learning options.” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, MD. “We will continue to follow the science and data and update recommendations as needed. We ask every North Carolinian to do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and follow the three W’s: Wear a face covering when in public, Wait 6 feet apart, Wash your hands.”

Governor Cooper also announced that the state will provide at least five reusable face coverings for every student, teacher and school staff member in public schools. In June, the state provided packs of personal protective equipment to schools that included a two-month supply of thermometers, surgical masks, face shields and gowns for school nurses and delegated staff who provide health care to students.

“Educators and stakeholders across our state have worked tirelessly to reopen our school buildings safely for our students, teachers and staff. Today, we take another critical step towards that goal. We also know families need to choose the option that is best for their children, so all school districts will provide remote learning options,” said Eric Davis, Chairman of the State Board of Education.

"In-person education is important for children, and it happens in the context of a community. This plan strikes the right balance between health and safety and the benefits of having children learn in the classroom. We must all continue with proven measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission like wearing a face covering, keeping distance between people, and frequent hand and surface cleanings so we can move closer to safely re-opening public schools," said Dr. Theresa Flynn, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, a practicing pediatrician who serves on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Pediatric Society and joined today’s announcement.

Under Plan B, schools are required to follow key safety measures that include:

  • Require face coverings for all teachers and students K-12
  • Limit the total number of students, staff and visitors within a school building to the extent necessary to ensure 6 feet distance can be maintained when students/staff will be stationary 
  • Conduct symptom screening, including temperature checks 
  • Establish a process and dedicated space for people who are ill to isolate and have transportation plans for ill students
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in the school and transportation vehicles regularly
  • Require frequent hand washing throughout the school day and provide hand sanitizer at entrances and in every classroom
  • Discontinue activities that bring together large groups 
  • Limit nonessential visitors and activities involving external groups 
  • Discontinue use of self-service food or beverage distribution 

In addition, schools are strongly recommended to follow additional safety measures that include:

  • Designate hallways and entrance/exit doors as one-way
  • Keep students and teachers in small groups that stay together as much as possible
  • Have meals delivered to the classroom or have students bring food back to the classroom if social distancing is not possible in the cafeteria
  • Discontinue activities that bring together large groups 
  • Place physical barriers such as plexiglass at reception desks and similar areas

More details can be found in the Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit. Read the Screening Reference Guide for schools and the Infection Control and PPE Guidance.

In addition to the announcement about school plans, Governor Cooper shared that North Carolina will remain paused in Safer At Home Phase 2 after the current Executive Order expires on Friday, July 17. 

“As we continue to see rising case numbers and hospitalizations, we will stay in Safer At Home Phase 2 for three more weeks,” said Governor Cooper. “Our re-opening priority is the school building doors, and in order for that to happen we have to work to stabilize our virus trends.”

School Groups on Today’s Public School Announcement

“While all school re-entry plans have their challenges during this pandemic, our superintendents, principals, and other school leaders will continue to prioritize student and staff safety in reopening schools under the cautious parameters outlined today by the Governor,” said North Carolina Association of School Administrators Executive Director Katherine Joyce. “We look forward to continuing work with the Governor, the General Assembly, and other state leaders to ensure our schools have the support needed to get student learning back on track in the safest manner possible in each local district.”

“I recognize Governor Cooper faced a very difficult decision. The good news is that local school boards can now begin to officially put their school reopening plans in motion,” said Brenda Stephens, President of the North Carolina School Board Association. “While the current situation may not be ideal for all, I’m confident North Carolina’s educators will continue to provide students with the best education possible.

 


 

Job Vacancy – Public Health Nurse II

Public Health Nurse II – Greene County Department of Public Health is seeking a Public Health Nurse II to work 40 hours per week (Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.) in health department clinic setting.

Responsibilities and Duties will include but are not limited to the following:

  • Coordinate the planning and provision of Women ’s Health Services, which include Family Planning and the Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program
  • Coordinate and update Women’s Health program manuals, policies, procedures, and standing orders, as needed
  • Interview patients and obtain comprehensive health histories
  • Provide appropriate education and counseling
  • Perform lab testing as allowed and needed
  • Dispense or administer medications according to Board of Pharmacy guidelines, as directed by the clinician or standing orders
  • Assist staff in other clinics as needed (i.e. Child Health, Communicable Disease, Adult Health, and Immunizations)
  • Follow up patients with abnormal physical findings and make appropriate and timely referrals
  • Assist with Public Health emergencies (i.e. communicable disease outbreaks, natural disasters)
  • Assist the Physician Extender with special procedures

Applicant must be a graduate from a four-year college or university with a B.S. in Nursing which includes a Public Health Nursing rotation and one year of Public Health Nursing experience; or Master’s in Public Health and graduation from a school of professional nursing and one year of professional nursing experience; or graduation from a school of professional nursing and two years of professional nursing experience including one year of Public Health Nursing experience; or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Additional Training/Experience: A registered nurse without a Bachelor of Science in nursing must satisfactorily complete Introduction to Principles and Practice of Public Health Nursing within one year of employment. Applicant must have a current license to practice as a Registered Nurse in North Carolina by the NC Board of Nursing.

Starting annual salary range is $42,152 - $50,974 (depending on education and/or experience). Includes benefits. No applications will be accepted after close of business on July 20, 2020.

Qualified applicants should submit a completed state application form (PD 107), cover letter, resume, and transcripts to:

Greene County Department of Public Health
PHN II Vacancy
227 Kingold Blvd., Suite B
Snow Hill, NC 28580

EOE

Previous applicants need not apply.

 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 24, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov



North Carolina Pauses in Safer At Home Phase 2, Adds Statewide Requirement for Face Coverings

As trends move in the wrong direction, state will not yet move into Phase 3

 

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen today announced that North Carolina will remain in Safer at Home Phase 2 for three more weeks. Cooper also announced that face coverings must be worn when people are in public places as officials seek to stabilize concerning trends of increasing viral spread. 

Cooper and Cohen were joined by Dennis Taylor, President of the North Carolina Nurses Association and Eugene A. Woods, President and CEO of Atrium Health.

“North Carolina is relying on the data and the science to lift restrictions responsibly, and right now our increasing numbers show we need to hit the pause button while we work to stabilize our trends,” said Governor Cooper. “We need to all work together so we can protect our families and neighbors, restore our economy, and get people back to work and our children back to school.” 

“I know North Carolinians are strong, resilient and care deeply about our communities. We pride ourselves on helping our neighbors. The best way we can do that now is by taking the simple action of wearing a face covering that covers your nose and mouth. If we each do our part, we can get back to the people and places we love,” said Dr. Mandy Cohen, NCDHHS Secretary.

Growing evidence shows that cloth face coverings, when worn consistently, can decrease the spread of COVID-19, especially among people who are not yet showing symptoms of the virus. Until now, face coverings had been strongly recommended. Under today’s executive order, people must wear face coverings when in public places where physical distancing is not possible. 

In addition, certain businesses must have employees and customers wear face coverings, including retail businesses, restaurants, personal care and grooming; employees of child care centers and camps; state government agencies under the Governor’s Cabinet; workers and riders of transportation; and workers in construction/trades, manufacturing, agriculture, meat processing and healthcare and long-term care settings.

“Wearing a face covering is an easy thing to do that can make a huge impact for all of us. A major spike in cases would be catastrophic to the system, and without your cooperation, nurses and our fellow healthcare providers will have a harder time caring for sick patients for weeks and months to come,” said Dennis Taylor, a nurse, and President of the North Carolina Nurses Association. 

“As the leader of the state’s largest health system, I am pro-health and also 100 percent pro-business. In fact, the two are inextricably connected and I’m very proud of the way business leaders and health experts are working together to keep our economy strong,” said Eugene A. Woods, President and CEO of Atrium Health. “Medical science says to reduce the spread of COVID-19 masking works, and my sincere hope is that all the people of North Carolina can join forces to make wearing a mask not something we feel we have to do – but something that we want to do to keep each other, our neighbors, our children and our loved ones healthy and safe”

Based on the metrics laid out in April by Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen, North Carolina is evaluating a combination of the data from the following categories that shows the indicators moving in the wrong direction, causing officials to implement today’s pause in Phase 2. 

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is increasing.

Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases starting to level, but is still increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive remains elevated. 

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations are increasing, though we have capacity in our healthcare system.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These areas include:

Laboratory Testing 

  • North Carolina is averaging more than 17,000 tests a day for the past week and there are more than 500 sites listed on online plus additional pop-up sites. 
  • North Carolina labs and labs around the country are seeing supply shortages for laboratory chemicals needed to process tests.

Tracing Capability

  • There are over 1,500 full-time and part-time staff supporting contact tracing efforts at the local health department level, including the 309 Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative contact tracers. These new hires reflect the diversity of the communities they serve, and 44% are bilingual.  

Personal Protective Equipment 

  • Our personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Businesses can download templates for signs on face coverings here [click.icptrack.com]. Downloadable social media graphics [click.icptrack.com] are also available for use. 

Read Executive Order No. 147 [click.icptrack.com] that implements today’s announcement. 

Read Frequently Asked Questions [click.icptrack.com] about today’s executive Order and mandatory face coverings. 

Read NCDHHS guidance on face coverings [click.icptrack.com].

View the slide presentation [click.icptrack.com] from today’s briefing. 

 


 

Are you interested in serving on the Board of Health?

The Greene County Board of Health is currently seeking one individual to serve on the board. We are recruiting for the following vacancy: Public Member. You must be a Greene County resident and attend 75% of the meetings. Board of Health members are appointed to three-year terms and may serve a maximum of three consecutive three-year terms. The Greene County Board of Health meets the 2nd Tuesday of every other month (January, March, May, July, September, and November) at 7 p.m. If you're interested in applying, please visit https://www.greenecountync.gov/human-resources for a Board Appointment Form. Applications will be accepted through Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5 p.m.

 


 

Count On Me NC

𝗔𝘀 𝗡𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗮𝗿𝗼𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗮’𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘂𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘀, 𝗵𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗹𝘀, 𝗮𝘁𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗯𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗼𝗽𝗲𝗻 𝗮𝗳𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗖𝗢𝗩𝗜𝗗-𝟭𝟵 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘆-𝗮𝘁-𝗵𝗼𝗺𝗲 𝗼𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗿, 𝗖𝗼𝘂𝗻𝘁 𝗢𝗻 𝗠𝗲 𝗡𝗖 𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗺𝘂𝘁𝘂𝗮𝗹 𝗽𝗹𝗲𝗱𝗴𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝘂𝗯𝗹𝗶𝗰 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗮𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗲𝗺𝗽𝗼𝘄𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝗴𝘂𝗲𝘀𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗯𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽 𝗸𝗲𝗲𝗽 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝘀𝗮𝗳𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱.

Go check out the website https://countonmenc.org/

  • make a pledge as a customer/community member
  • complete provided online training as a business, and receive a certificate of completion to show your community!

 


 

Safer At Home Phase 2

On Friday at 5 pm, North Carolina will move to Safer At Home Phase 2. After two weeks in Phase 1, the state’s overall key indicators remain stable but the continued increases in daily case counts signal a need to take a more modest step forward in Phase 2 than originally envisioned.

In making the announcement to lift COVID-19 restrictions, Governor Cooper said, “North Carolina is using the data to guide our decisions about when to lift COVID-19 restrictions, and overall our key indicators remain stable. Safer At Home Phase 2 is another careful step forward, and we have to continue taking this virus seriously to prevent a dangerous spike in infections.”

“From the beginning, North Carolinians have joined together to confront this crisis. We need to rely upon one another to practice the three Ws [covid19.ncdhhs.gov] as we begin leaving our homes more. When we wear a face covering, wait six feet apart, and wash our hands often, we are showing we care for our loved ones and neighbors,” said Dr. Mandy Cohen.

NC DHHS also unveiled an updated COVID-19 Dashboard [covid19.ncdhhs.gov]. The interactive dashboard provides an overview on the metrics and capacities that the state is following to inform decisions to responsibly ease measures that slow the spread of the virus.

Phase 2 Resources

 Interim Guidance for:

 


 

More than 800,000 Children Impacted by the COVID-19 Pandemic to Receive Additional Help Buying Food 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 13, 2020
Contact: news@dhhs.nc.gov
(919) 855-4840

 

RALEIGH — Starting today, families impacted by school closings due to COVID-19 are beginning to receive additional food benefits as part of the new Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) program [ncdhhs.us4.list-manage.com] announced by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 

The program provides a food benefit on an EBT card to North Carolina families whose children have access to free and reduced lunch at school. Families will receive about $370 in P-EBT benefits per child, provided over two installments. Families can use the P-EBT benefit to purchase food items at EBT authorized retailers, including most major grocery stores.

"With school buildings closed, we need to make sure that children who get most of their meals at school have enough to eat," said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D. "This program provides families with extra help buying groceries and putting food on the table."

Families will not need to apply for the P-EBT program. Yesterday, most P-EBT eligible families already receiving Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) benefits received additional funds on their existing EBT card. Some FNS families will instead receive the benefit on a new EBT card. P-EBT eligible families not already enrolled in FNS will be mailed a new EBT card in mid- to late May. Families who receive a new EBT card will receive a letter from NCDHHS in the mail explaining how to activate and use their card.

The new P-EBT program is in addition to other services families may be participating in. As announced previously, all families that receive Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) have received the maximum amount allowed for March and April 2020 for their household size and will receive the maximum amount for May as well. 

P-EBT benefits are entirely federally funded. North Carolina was the fourth state to receive federal approval to provide P-EBT benefits. More information about the P-EBT program can be found at www.ncdhhs.gov/PEBT [ncdhhs.us4.list-manage.com]


 

North Carolina is moving to Phase 1

On May 5th, Governor Cooper modified North Carolina’s Stay At Home Executive Order, transitioning the state to Phase 1 of slowly easing COVID-19 restrictions. Executive Order 138 goes into on Friday, May 8 at 5 pm. 

Highlights of Phase 1 include:

  • Any retail business may open at 50 percent capacity. Businesses will be required to practice social distancing, perform frequent cleanings, provide hand sanitizer when available, screen workers for symptoms and more.
  • People may leave their homes for commercial activity at any business that is open. 
  • Certain businesses remain closed, including bars, personal care businesses, entertainment venues, and gyms. Restaurants may only continue to serve customers for drive-through, take-out and delivery. 
  • Teleworking is still encouraged for businesses that can practice it.
  • Cloth face coverings are recommended when you leave the house and may be near other people who are not family or household members.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) created several materials [ncdhhs.gov] to help businesses navigate Phase 1, including:

  • NCDHHS Checklist for Business Owners
  • Interim Guidance for Owners, Staff, and Patrons of Businesses 
  • Symptom Screening Checklist
  • Templates to Meet Required Signage

DHHS also previewed a new campaign, Know Your Ws! While North Carolinians should still stay home, if they go out, they should know their Ws: Wear. Wait. Wash.

  • Wear a face covering,
  • Wait 6 feet apart from other people.
  • Wash your hands often and

A Know Your Ws flyer is available in English and Spanish. More materials will be coming.

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 5, 2020
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov



Governor Cooper Announces Modified Stay At Home Order and

Transition to Phase 1 of Easing Restrictions 

New order [click.icptrack.com] takes effect Friday, May 8 at 5 pm 

Personal care businesses, entertainment venues, gyms to remain closed

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper today signed Executive Order No. 138 [click.icptrack.com]to modify North Carolina’s Stay At Home order and transition to Phase 1 of slowly easing certain COVID-19 restrictions effective Friday, May 8 at 5 pm. Certain businesses remain closed as the state continues battling COVID-19. 

“COVID-19 is still a serious threat to our state, and Phase 1 is designed to be a limited easing of restrictions that can boost parts of our economy while keeping important safety rules in place,” said Governor Cooper. “This is a careful and deliberate first step, guided by the data, and North Carolinians still must use caution while this virus is circulating.”

“We must continue to protect our families and neighbors as we take this cautious step forward. When you leave your home, follow the three W’s: Wear a face covering, wash your hands, and wait six feet apart,” said Dr. Mandy Cohen, Secretary of the NC Department of Health and Human Services.  

Today’s Order removes the distinction between essential and non-essential businesses. Retail businesses are allowed to open at 50% capacity and will be required to direct customers to stand 6 feet apart, perform frequent cleanings, provide hand sanitizer when available, screen workers for symptoms and more. The Order allows people to leave their homes for commercial activity at any business that is open. 

Certain businesses remain closed, including bars, personal care businesses, entertainment venues, and gyms. Restaurants may only continue to serve customers for drive-through, take out and delivery. 

All workers at retail and other businesses are recommended to wear cloth face coverings. Teleworking is still encouraged for businesses that can practice it.

Though small outdoor gatherings will be allowed in Phase 1, gatherings of more than 10 people generally are still prohibited. The Order encourages cloth face coverings to be worn when outside the home and in contact with others. Everyone who uses a face covering should adhere to this guidance without fear of profiling or bias.

During Phase 1, childcare facilities will be open to serve families of parents who are working or looking for work. These centers will be required to follow strict cleaning protocols. Summer day camps can operate in compliance with NC DHHS guidelines.

In explaining today’s Order, Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen reported North Carolina remains stable on the following key metrics:

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is decreasing. 

Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases over the last 14 days cases is slightly increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive over the last 14 days is decreasing. 

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations over the last 14 days is level. 

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These areas include:

Laboratory Testing 

  • North Carolina has doubled the daily testing rate. 

Tracing Capability

  • The Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative has received over 4,000 applications and is in the process of hiring 250 new contact tracers. 

Personal Protective Equipment 

  • Supply chains continue to improve with the exception of gowns. 

The order is in effect until 5 pm on Friday, May 22. However, the end of this Order does not necessarily mean the state will move to Phase 2. Phase 2 will only start if data and indicators are in the right place. 

Read Frequently Asked Questions [click.icptrack.com] about today’s Order. 

Read a copy of today’s graphs and slides [click.icptrack.com].

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 4, 2020
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov

 

Governor Roy Cooper today signed the following COVID-19 relief bills into law:

“I am signing into law two critical relief bills that will provide assistance to families, schools, hospitals and small businesses as our state battles COVID-19,” said Governor Cooper. “There is more work ahead of us, and I hope the spirit of consensus behind these bills will continue.”

The Governor was joined by House Speaker Tim Moore, Democratic House Leader Darren Jackson, Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger and Democratic Senate Leader Dan Blue. 

"The General Assembly crafted a bipartisan COVID-19 relief package that puts North Carolina on the right path to recovery. Governor Cooper's signature on these bills sends a signal to our citizens that our state is moving past this crisis and that action is being taken to address their concerns," said Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger. 

“I am proud of the work that we have done in the Senate to address the pressing needs in our state,” said Senate Democratic Leader Dan Blue. “I look forward to working with Senator Berger on the next COVID-19 relief package so that we can build a stronger, more resilient for all North Carolinians.”

“North Carolina is leading the nation’s recovery through bipartisan consensus for swift action to assist every community in our state affected by this pandemic. I appreciate the successful collaboration among our legislative colleagues and the Governor to provide this powerful support for North Carolinians.” said Speaker of the House Tim Moore

“Citizens expect bipartisan progress and we are off to a good start. Now we need to do more for front-line workers, the unemployed, and people without health insurance.” said House Democratic Leader Darren Jackson

The relief package, which was passed unanimously, includes almost $1.6 billion in relief measures for critical expenditures related to public health and safety, educational needs, small business assistance, and continuity of state government operations. Of this amount, $1.4 billion has been appropriated and $150 million is set aside in a reserve fund for future local government needs. 

The package also contains key policy changes to support North Carolinians as the state battles COVID-19. 

HB 1043, the spending package, allocates federal funding sent to the state from the CARES Act. It includes:

  • $50 million to provide personal protective equipment and sanitation supplies
  • $25 million to support enhanced COVID-19 testing and tracing
  • $125 million in small business loans administered through the Golden LEAF Foundation
  • $50 million in health support for underserved communities including rural areas and minority communities 
  • $95 million to support North Carolina hospitals
  • $20 million to support local health departments and the State Health Lab 
  • $75 million for school nutrition programs
  • $70 million for summer learning programs 
  • $30 million for local schools to purchase computers and other devices for students
  • $6 million for food banks
  • $9 million for rural broadband 
  • $85 million for vaccine development, antibody testing, community testing, and other COVID-19-related research at Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, East Carolina University, Campbell University, and Wake Forest University.

Senate Bill 704 contained provisions to help North Carolinians. It includes:

  • An extension of driver’s license and registration expiration deadlines
  • Waived interest on tax payments normally due in April
  • Modifies end-of-grade testing requirements for public schools
  • Adjusts the 2020-21 K-12 public school calendar
  • Allows pharmacists to administer a COVID-19 vaccine once it is developed
 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 24, 2020
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov



Governor Cooper, State Education Leaders: Remote Learning To Continue Through End of 2019-2020 School Year

Cooper also proposes $1.4 billion COVID-19 relief package using federal funds

 

RALEIGH:  Governor Roy Cooper today announced that North Carolina K-12 public schools will continue remote learning through the end of the 2019-2020 school year. Cooper was joined by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson and the Chair of the State Board of Education Eric Davis for the announcement. 

“School buildings will stay closed to students for this school year, but school isn’t over,” said Governor Cooper. “The decision to finish the year by remote learning was not made lightly, but it is the right thing to do to protect our students, teachers and communities. This is a difficult time for many children and parents, and I am grateful for all the educators, administrators, support staff and parents who have gone the extra mile to keep children learning.”

Cooper underscored the needs for schools to continue to provide school nutrition programs now and into the summer, and to be looking ahead and planning for when it is safe to re-convene schools in person. This includes how to get students back on track, especially those who have not been able to access remote learning or were already behind when schools closed to in-person instruction.

To help students without home internet access online learning opportunities, Cooper today announced a partnership to equip more school buses with Wi-Fi. School buses with Wi-Fi will travel to areas that lack internet so students can turn in assignments, download materials, and connect with teachers. AT&T is providing 100 hot spots, Duke Energy Foundation is providing 80, and additional partners are expected to join the effort.

State public health officials are developing safety guidelines for schools to follow when classes are able to convene in person, as well as guidance for summer camps and other groups that use school facilities.

BUDGET

Cooper also released a recommended budget plan to invest $1.4 billion in emergency funds to help North Carolina respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding for this proposal would come predominantly from the state’s share of the federal CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) and would be appropriated by the North Carolina General Assembly in its upcoming session.

The budget package is intended to fund immediate needs in three main areas:

  • Public health and safety
  • Continuity of operations for education and other state government services
  • Assistance to small businesses and local governments. 

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every North Carolinian. This emergency funding proposal makes strong investments in public health, schools, local governments and small businesses to respond to this unprecedented crisis,” said Cooper. 

Governor Cooper and State Budget Director Charlie Perusse worked with state agencies, local governments, and other stakeholders to identify what immediate COVID-related needs were unmet by existing federal and commercial assistance to build a budget proposal that is responsive and responsible. 

Key investments from this proposal include:

  • $75 million to support testing, tracing and trends analysis as well as have the Personal Protective Equipment needed to help North Carolina move into Phase 1 of easing restrictions;
  • $78 million for school nutrition to continue to serve as many as 500,000 meals a day to children who depend on these meals to meet basic nutrition needs typically met in school;
  • $75 million for rural and underserved communities and health care providers that are particularly hard hit by COVID-19; 
  • $243 million for public schools to enhance remote learning and get ready for the next school year in a “new normal.” Funds are a joint request from DPI and the State Board of Education.
  • $52 million to the UNC system and private colleges to help with remote learning and COVID-19 impacts;
  • $300 million to assist local governments, distributed based partially on population and partially on acute need. 

“We know that people are hurting, businesses are struggling, and local governments are facing severe shortages. That’s why we have to act now to get resources in the hands of people and organizations that provide vital support,” said Cooper.

Governor Cooper and State Budget Director Charlie Perusse have been in discussions with leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly for several weeks to develop a consensus COVID-19 budget package that can be approved swiftly when the legislature returns next week. Elements of this package have already been announced as having consensus support, including a significant investment in an already operating bridge loan program for small businesses through the Golden L.E.A.F. Foundation. 

“This plan is a first step, and while it may not have all that North Carolina needs moving forward I present it in the spirit of compromise and consensus so that we can get relief to families fast,” said Cooper.

Find a slideshow summary of the budget recommendation [click.icptrack.com]

Read more about the full budget recommendation money report [click.icptrack.com] and provision list [click.icptrack.com].

 


 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 23, 2020
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov

 

UPDATED: Governor Extends Stay At Home Order Through May 8, Plans Three Phase Lifting of Restrictions Based on Virus Trends

See Slide Deck from Today's Briefing HERE [click.icptrack.com].

 

RALEIGH:  Governor Roy Cooper today issued Executive Order No [click.icptrack.com]. 135 [click.icptrack.com] extending North Carolina’s Stay At Home order through May 8. The orders extending closure of restaurants for dine-in service and bars and closure of other close-contact businesses are also extended through May 8. 

Governor Cooper shared details about North Carolina’s plan to lift restrictions in three phases once the data show that key metrics are headed in the right direction. 

“The health and safety of people in North Carolina must be our top priority,” Cooper said. “This plan provides a roadmap for us to begin easing restrictions in stages to push our economy forward.”

Last week, Governor Cooper laid out the path forward centered on three things: testing, tracing and trends. Today, Governor Cooper and Dr. Mandy Cohen, Secretary of NC Department of Health and Human Services, shared more specifics on those key metrics. The Stay At Home and other orders are extended today because North Carolina has not yet seen a downward trajectory of those metrics needed to begin gradually lifting restrictions. 

“North Carolina cannot stay at home indefinitely,” added Governor Cooper. “We have to get more people back to work. Right now, the decision to stay at home is based on the public health data and White House guidance. North Carolina needs more time to slow the spread of this virus before we can safely begin lifting restrictions. I know that this pandemic has made life difficult for many people in our state and I am focused on keeping our communities safe while planning to slowly lift restrictions to help cushion the blow to our economy.”

“Data has driven our decisions, starting with the aggressive measures Governor Cooper took early on to slow the spread of COVID-19. Those actions combined with North Carolinians’ resolve to stay home to protect their loved ones have put our state on the right path. If we stick to these efforts right now we will continue to see a slowing of virus spread and we can slowly begin easing restrictions,” said Secretary Cohen.

A detailed look at where North Carolina stands on testing, tracing and trends and more information about the three-phase plan can be found in today’s presentation [click.icptrack.com]. The metrics that North Carolina is considering aligns with the White House guidance for Opening Up American Again. 

In order to begin lifting restrictions, North Carolina needs to see progress in these key metrics:

  • Sustained Leveling or Decreased Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days
  • Currently, North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is decreasing over the last 14 days.
  • Sustained Leveling or Decreased Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days
  • Currently, North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases over the last 14 days cases is still increasing, although at a slower rate.
  • Sustained Leveling or Decreased Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days
  • Currently, North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive over the last 14 days is increasing at a slow rate.
  • Sustained Leveling or Decreased Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days
  • Currently, North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations over the last 14 days is largely level with a slight trend upward. 

In addition to these metrics, the state will continue building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These include:

  • Increase in Laboratory Testing 
  • Currently, North Carolina is testing approximately 2,500 to 3,000 people per day and is working to increase to at least 5,000 to 7,000 per day.
  • Increase in Tracing Capability
  • Currently, North Carolina has approximately 250 people doing contact tracing across its local health departments and is working to double this workforce to 500.
  • Availability of Personal Protective Equipment 
  • The state is working to ensure there are adequate supplies to fulfill requests for critical PPE for at least 30 days. This includes face shields, gloves, gowns, N95 masks, and surgical and procedural masks. Currently the state has less than 30 days supply of gowns and N95 masks. Availability of PPE is calculated based on the average number of requests for the last 14 days compared to the supply that the state has on hand.

Governor Cooper also shared information about how North Carolina can gradually re-open over three phases to prevent hot spots of viral spread while also beginning to bring our economy back. These phases are based on the best information available now, but could be altered as new information emerges. 

In Phase 1:

  • Modify the Stay At Home order allow travel not currently defined as essential allowing people to leave home for commercial activity at any business that is allowed to be open, such as clothing stores, sporting goods stores, book shops, houseware stores and other retailers. 
  • Ensure that any open stores implement appropriate employee and consumer social distancing, enhanced hygiene and cleaning protocols, symptom screening of employees, accommodations for vulnerable workers, and provide education to employees and workers to combat misinformation 
  • Continue to limit gatherings to no more than 10 people
  • Reopen parks that have been closed subject to the same gathering limitation. Outdoor exercise will continue to be encouraged. 
  • Continue to recommend face coverings in public spaces when 6 feet of distancing isn’t possible
  • Encourage employers to continue teleworking policies
  • Continue rigorous restrictions on nursing homes and other congregant care settings 
  • Local emergency orders with more restrictive measures may remain in place. 

Phase 2

At least 2-3 weeks after Phase 1

  • Lift Stay At Home order with strong encouragement for vulnerable populations to continue staying at home to stay safe
  • Allow limited opening of restaurants, bars, fitness centers, personal care services, and other businesses that can follow safety protocols including the potential need to reduce capacity
  • Allow gathering at places such as houses of worship and entertainment venues at reduced capacity
  • Increase in number of people allowed at gatherings
  • Open public playgrounds
  • Continue rigorous restrictions on nursing homes and other congregant care settings 

Phase 3

At least 4-6 weeks after Phase 2

  • Lessen restrictions for vulnerable populations with encouragement to continue practicing physical distancing and minimizing exposure to settings where distancing isn’t possible
  • Allow increased capacity at restaurants, bars, other businesses, houses of worships, and entertainment venues
  • Further increase the number of people allowed at gatherings
  • Continue rigorous restrictions on nursing homes and other congregant care settings 

Governor Cooper and Dr. Cohen both underscored the need for the testing, tracing and trends to move in the right direction for each of these phases to move forward. If there is a spike in infections, tightening of restrictions may be needed temporarily.

Information about K-12 public schools will follow later this week. 

 


 

Raleigh, NC
April 21, 2020
 

North Carolina Leaders Act to Protect Workers at Food Processing Facilities

After witnessing outbreaks at food processing plants in other states and receiving reports of cases among workers in our state, North Carolina public and private leaders have come together to take swift action to protect workers here from COVID-19. The NC Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS), the NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (NCDACS), local health departments, plant managers and corporate owners, community health centers and local hospitals are working together to keep workers safe and to help ensure the world’s food supply remains stable.
 
"Agriculture and agribusinesses are on the front lines of this crisis just like hospital workers, first responders, grocery store staff, truck drivers and many more. Their work is different, but every bit as critically important," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "We are in contact with the companies, public health officials and our federal inspection partners. The companies are working to implement recommendations of the CDC and state public health and local officials to keep these facilities operating and producing a stable supply of safe and nutritious food."

Following consultation with the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NCDHHS and NCDACS developed interim guidance to help protect workers at food processing facilities from COVID-19. The interim guidance builds on previous CDC guidance for essential workers. It is not intended to replace any existing worker health and safety requirements of the U.S. and North Carolina Departments of Labor. Food processing facilities in North Carolina are regulated by the NC Department of Labor (NCDOL) for industrial hazards, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture and NCDACS for food handling and safety.
 
There are currently outbreaks in five food processing facilities located in Bladen, Chatham Duplin, Lee and Robeson counties. An outbreak is defined as two or more positive cases. Local health departments are conducting outbreak investigations including contact tracing to determine who else may have been exposed. Health care providers and hospitals are ensuring that those who test positive for COVID-19 are connected to care.
 
Food processing plants report that they are doing temperature and symptom checks, encouraging sick employees to stay home and implementing paid sick leave for those with COVID-19 or suspected of having COVID-19. They are also providing personal protective equipment and employing social distancing policies where possible. Strike teams composed of staff from NCDHHS, NCDACS, NCDOL and local health departments and with virtual support from NIOSH will be available to conduct on-site assessments and providing technical assistance to plants to limit further spread.
 
"North Carolina’s response to COVID-19 cuts across departments and sectors, particularly when it comes to protecting those working so that we all have food to put on our tables. The department will continue to provide guidance and support to our sister agencies and partners on the ground as they respond to this new virus," said Mark Benton, Assistant Secretary for Public Health at NCDHHS.  

Workers at food processing facilities help ensure the world’s food supply remains stable and provide an essential service to the state and country and globally. There are 200 food processing facilities in North Carolina. Food and agriculture is recognized by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as being one of 16 critical infrastructures for national security.  
 
According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), there is no evidence that food or food packaging is associated with the transmission of COVID-19.

For more information on North Carolina’s COVID-19 response and links to other guidance go to: www.nc.gov/covid19.


 

Raleigh, NC
April 9, 2020
 
Governor Cooper Signs Order to Tighten Social Distancing Measures, Strengthen Long-Term Care Rules and Streamline Unemployment Benefits Process

Governor Roy Cooper took action to the address the spread of COVID-19 by issuing stronger social distancing requirements and speeding up the process to get benefits to people out of work through Executive Order No. 131 Open PDF.

Three key areas are addressed in Executive Order 131. The first requires retail stores that are still operating to implement new social distancing policies to make shopping safer for customers and employees. The second makes earlier COVID-19 guidelines mandatory for nursing facilities, and recommends other long-term care facilities to do the same. The third area is unemployment benefits, issuing changes that will speed up certain benefit payments to those who are out of work.

“North Carolina continues to take strong action to slow the spread of COVID-19, and today’s Order will help make stores safer, protect those living and working in nursing homes, and get more unemployment benefits out quicker. Our state is resilient, and we will get through this crisis together if we all do our part,” said Governor Cooper. 

POLICIES FOR SOCIAL DISTANCING IN RETAIL STORES

This Order offers clear requirements that essential businesses must implement in order to safeguard the health of customers and employees. Some of the directives include:

  • Setting limits of how many people can be in a store at one time, 5 people per 1,000 square feet of retail space or 20% of fire marshal posted occupancy limits 
  • Marking 6 feet of distance for areas where people gather like checkout lines
  • Requiring specific cleaning measures for retail stores

The Order encourages:

  • Implementing hygiene recommendations for employees and customers, like hand sanitizer at the doors and face coverings for workers
  • Establishing designated shopping times designated for high-risk groups
  • Creating barriers between customers and employees at checkout to lower the risk of required interactions

The Order states these requirements will last for thirty days unless extended by further executive action.

LOWERING RISK IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES

The Order sets public health and safety requirements for nursing homes during the public health emergency. The Order encourages other long-term care facilities to follow the same guidance. Some of the directives include:

  • Canceling communal activities, including group meals
  • Taking the temperature of employees and essential personnel when they enter the facility
  • Requiring specific personal protective equipment in the facility
  • Requiring close monitoring of residents for COVID-19 health indicators like body temperature

The Order states these requirements will last until this order is repealed.

STREAMLINING UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE CLAIMS

The Order makes it easier for employers to file a batch of claims, called an attached claim, on behalf of their employees. By temporarily eliminating some of the hurdles for employers, benefits can get in the hands of those who need them faster. 

The Order will extend 60 days beyond the date the state of emergency is lifted to allow employers to get back on their feet.
Additionally, the Department of Employment Services issued information on timing of federal benefits reaching North Carolinians today. 

Read the full Order Open PDF.

Read questions and answers Open PDF about specific items in the order. 

Make sure the information you are getting about COVID-19 is coming directly from reliable sources like the CDC and NCDHHS. For more information, please visit the CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus and NCDHHS’ website at www.ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus, which includes daily updates on positive COVID-19 test results in North Carolina.

 


 

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) is available online

These are stressful times for parents and caregivers, with so many normal routines affected--jobs interrupted, schools closed, businesses closed or services severely limited.  These stressors can adversely affect parent/child interactions. 

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) Online is available to all NC parents free of charge.  It provides resources for parents and caregivers who are parenting during stressful times.  Any parent can access Triple P Online at the following webpage: https://www.triplep-parenting.com/nc-en/triple-p/ [triplep-parenting.com].


 

NC 2-1-1 is now a resource for people to call for assistance related to the COVID-19 coronavirus

NC 2-1-1 [click.icptrack.com] is an information and referral service that families and individuals can call to obtain free and confidential information on health and human services resources within their community. NC 2-1-1 operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and resources are available in most languages.

“Services like NC 2-1-1 are critical during times of emergency,” said Governor Cooper. “North Carolinians can now call 2-1-1 to get the information they need while we continue working together to prevent the spread of this virus.”

North Carolinians can text COVIDNC to 898211 to receive general information and updates about COVID-19. Sign up now to get regular alerts on the rapidly evolving situation and North Carolina’s response.

NC 2-1-1 can refer callers to the organizations in their local community best equipped to address their specific health and human services needs including food, shelter, energy assistance, housing, parenting resources, health care, employment, substance abuse treatment, as well as specific resources for older adults and for persons with disabilities, and much more. Simply dial 2-1-1 or TTY 888-892-1162 for assistance.

NC 2-1-1 cannot provide direct medical services, and COVID-19 can only be diagnosed by a health care professional. If you suspect you or someone you care for may have symptoms or have been exposed to the virus, you should contact your health care provider. If you do not have a provider, you can call your local health department [click.icptrack.com], free and charitable clinics or a Federally Qualified Health Clinic [click.icptrack.com] for guidance.

People should only call 9-1-1 if they are experiencing an emergency. 9-1-1 centers across North Carolina have been receiving general questions and other non-emergency calls related to COVID-19. Please do not call 9-1-1 unless you have an emergency.

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19 in North Carolina, go to ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus [click.icptrack.com].

Due to anticipated high call volume, those seeking general information about COVID-19 are strongly encouraged to sign up for texts. People who are trying to locate specific services would benefit by calling. To learn more about NC 2-1-1, visit nc211.org [click.icptrack.com].

 


 

 

 


Health Department now offering an additional Child Health Clinic on Tuesday mornings starting March 3, 2020

 

 


 

WIC Self-referral Form

WIC is the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. It is commonly referred to as the WIC Program. Greene County Department of Public Health provides WIC Program services. WIC provides nutrition education, breastfeeding support, healthy food, health referrals and other services free of charge to North Carolina families who qualify. The WIC Program promotes healthy habits and healthy families to pregnant, breastfeeding and postpartum women, infants and children until age 5. By filling out this WIC Self-referral form, our WIC program will contact you!

https://www.nutritionnc.com/wic/wic-referral.asp


 


2019 State of the County Health Report

Greene County Department of Public Health is pleased to share the 2019 State of the County Health (SOTCH) Report. This report provides an annual review of the health of our community, tracks progress regarding health priorities and concerns, and identifies new initiatives and emerging issues that affect the health status of Greene County residents.  The information is designed to educate and update community members, community leaders, elected officials and local agencies.  Click here to view the 2019 SOTCH Report.

For more information about how public health is working for you, feel free to contact Joy S. Brock by phone (252) 747-8183 or email joy.brock@greenecountync.gov

County residents are also encouraged to attend regular meetings of the Greene County Board of Health to learn more about public health in the county.  The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Health is Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 7 p.m. at the Greene County Senior Center.

 


2018 Community Health Needs Assessment 

The Community Health Needs Assessment process is a four‐year cycle in which local health departments across North Carolina are charged with the responsibility of conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) in their respective counties. The CHNA is required of public health departments in the consolidated agreement between the North Carolina Division of Public Health and the local public health agency. Furthermore, a CHNA is required for local public health department accreditation through the NC Local Health Department Accreditation Board (G.S. § 130A-34.1).

Community Health Needs Assessments are the foundation for improving and promoting the health of the community. The role of the assessment is to identify factors that affect the health of a population and determine the availability of resources within the community to adequately address those issues. The completed CHNA serves as the basis for prioritizing the community’s health needs and culminates in planning to meet those needs.

To view the 2018 Community Health Needs Assessment for Greene County, please click here.


 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
To view the complete Non-Discrimination Statement in English and Spanish, please click here.

 


For more information regarding public health issues or health department services, contact Joy S. Brock at (252) 747-8183 or joy.brock@greenecountync.gov.