Health

The mission of the Greene County Health Department is to Protect, Preserve and Enhance the public health of Greene County through a commitment to the principles of public health practice in our community.

Joy Brock, Director

227 Kingold Boulevard, Suite B
Snow Hill, NC 28580
Phone (252) 747-8183
Fax (252) 747-4040
Email joy.brock@greenecountync.gov
Be Sure to Like Us on Facebook - Greene County Department of Public Health

 

No-cost COVID-19 Testing Event in Greene County

during the month of November

Click here for more details (English flyer)
Click here for more details (Spanish flyer)

 


 

Flu Shots available at the Health Department

Greene County Department of Public Health is now offering flu shots. Flu shots are available Monday through Friday by appointment only.  This year, appointments are required in order to help us maintain social distancing in our waiting area. There are more appointment opportunities on Fridays. To schedule your appointment, please call the Health Department at (252) 747-8181.  

Flu shots are $30. Cash, checks, MasterCard, VISA and Discover Card are accepted.  If you receive Blue Cross Blue Shield North Carolina, North Carolina State Health Plan, Medicare Part B or Medicaid, please bring your card with you.    

 


 

COVID-19 SUPPORT

Quarantine or Isolation Help for People who have tested positive, been exposed to, or are at high-risk of COVID-19
Click here for more details
 

 

COVID-19 NC Information click here

 

Health Department's Press Releases:

11/23/2020 Daily Update - click here

11/19/2020 Daily Update - click here

11/16/2020 Daily Update - click here

11/12/2020 Daily Update - click here

11/9/2020 Daily Update - click here 

11/2/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/21/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/19/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/15/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/8/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/7/2020 Daily Update - click here

10/5/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/24/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/21/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/11/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

09/03/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/31/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/28/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/25/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/24/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/18/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/10/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/05/2020 Daily Update - click here

08/03/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/27/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/20/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/15/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/14/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/07/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/06/2020 Daily Update - click here

07/01/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/23/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/18/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/16/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/15/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/12/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/09/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/04/2020 Daily Update - click here

06/03/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/26/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/22/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/21/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/19/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/18/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/14/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/13/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/11/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/08/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/06/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/04/2020 Daily Update - click here

05/01/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/30/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/29/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/23/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/17/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/13/2020 Daily Update (pm) - click here

4/13/2020 Daily Update (am) - click here

4/12/2020 Daily Update (pm) - click here

4/12/2020 Daily Update (am) - click here

4/9/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/8/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/7/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/6/2020 Daily Update - click here

4/2/2020 Press Release - click here

4/1/2020 Press Release - click here

3/26/2020 Press Release - click here

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 17, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov 



North Carolina Introduces COVID-19 County Alert System

State to work with key counties to bring numbers down
To read more and see Frequently Asked Questions, visit the alert page.

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper and Dr. Mandy Cohen, Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) announced a new COVID-19 County Alert System to pinpoint counties with the highest levels of viral spread and offer specific recommendations to bring numbers down. This system will help give local leaders another tool to understand how their county is faring and to make decisions about actions to slow viral spread. The map will be updated every four weeks. 

“By pinpointing counties with high virus transmission and asking everyone in those counties to work with us and do more right now to slow the spread of the virus, we can succeed,” Governor Cooper said. “It can help bring down their case rates, keep their communities safer, save lives and keep their hospital systems working.”

“It’s going to take all of us working together to avoid tightening restrictions like so many states are now doing,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen. “The COVID-19 County Alert System gives North Carolinians an easy way to see how their county is doing and know what they can do protect their family and neighbors and slow the spread of this virus.”

The system uses metrics informed by the White House Coronavirus Task Force and North Carolina’s key metrics to categorize counties into three tiers:

Yellow: Significant Community Spread

Orange: Substantial Community Spread

Red: Critical Community Spread

Because no one metric provides a complete picture, the COVID-19 County Alert System uses a combination of three metrics: case rate, the percent of tests that are positive, and hospital impact within the county. 

To be assigned to the red or orange tier, a county must meet the threshold for case rate for that tier AND the threshold for either percent positive OR hospital impact. 

  • Case Rate: The number of new cases in 14 days per 100,000 people
  • Percent Positive: The percent of tests that are positive over 14 days 
  • Hospital Impact: A composite score based on the impact that COVID-19 has had on hospitals including percent of COVID-19 hospitalizations, COVID-19 related visits to the Emergency Department, staffed open hospital beds, and critical staffing shortages over 14 days

 

Counties that do not meet criteria for red or orange are categorized as being in the yellow tier (significant community spread) and should continue to be vigilant to prevent further spread of COVID-19.

Recommended Actions

The Alert System includes recommendations for individuals, businesses, community organizations and public officials in every county, as well as specific stepped-up recommendations for orange and red counties. 

 

 

 

 


 

NCDHHS Announces First Flu-Related Death of the 2020-21 Flu Season

Raleigh, N.C.

Officials with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services’ Division of Public Health today announced the first reported flu-related death of the 2020-21 flu season, which occurred the first week of October and involved an adult over 65 years of age in the central part of the state. NCDHHS staff and leadership extend their sympathies to the family and loved ones of this individual during this difficult time. To protect the privacy of the family, the person's hometown, county, age and gender will not be released.

“This is a sad reminder that flu can be a serious illness and can lead to complications and even death in some cases,” said State Epidemiologist Zack Moore, M.D., MPH. “With flu season starting during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever for people to get a flu vaccine this year.”

During the 2019-20 flu season, 186 flu deaths were reported in North Carolina, down from 208 deaths during the 2018-19 flu season. Of those 186 deaths, 105 were people age 65 and older and five were under the age of 18.

The flu vaccine is the best way to prevent flu and its complications. It lowers your likelihood of getting sick. And if you do catch the flu, it’s likely to be milder than if you weren’t vaccinated.  Each year, scientists and health experts develop seasonal flu shots to protect against the three or four flu strains that research suggests will be most common during the upcoming season. The vaccine works by triggering your body to produce protective antibodies that help prevent the flu.

The CDC recommends flu vaccination every year for everyone 6 months and older. Vaccination is the best way to prevent infection with the flu. It is especially important for those at higher risk of more serious outcomes, such as people over 65 years old, children younger than 5, pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Some of these same groups are also at high risk of complications from COVID-19.

Flu vaccinations are available at hospitals, pharmacies, private medical offices, some federally qualified health care centers and local health departments. To find a flu vaccine near you, visit vaccinefinder.org/find-vaccine.

In North Carolina, flu infections are most common from late fall to early spring with activity usually peaking in January or February. In addition to getting a flu vaccine, the following precautions should be taken to protect against the spread of flu, COVID-19 and other viruses:

  • Continue to practice the 3Ws — wearing a face covering over your nose and mouth, waiting 6 feet apart, and washing your hands often can help slow the spread of COVID-19 and flu
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and then discard the tissue promptly
  • Stay home when sick, except to seek medical care or testing, and take steps to avoid spreading infection to others in your home, including:
    • Staying in a separate room from other household members, if possible
    • Using a separate bathroom, if possible
    • Avoiding contact with other members of the household and pets
    • Not sharing personal household items like cups, towels and utensils
    • Wearing a mask when around other people, if you are able to

Individuals who feel ill should call ahead before going to a doctor’s office, local health department or urgent care to avoid exposing others. COVID-19 and flu symptoms are similar, so consult with a doctor about getting tested for flu and/or COVID-19. Flu symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Cough and/or sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Headaches and/or body aches
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea (most common in children)

Anyone who thinks they have the flu should also contact their doctor right away to see if they need treatment with a prescription antiviral drug. Early treatment with an antiviral drug can help prevent flu infections from becoming more serious. Treatment with a prescription antiviral drug is especially important for hospitalized patients, people with severe flu illness and those who are at high risk of serious flu complications based on their age or health.

DPH’s surveillance for the 2020-21 flu season began Sept. 27 and will continue through late May. A combined COVID-19 and influenza surveillance summary that includes information on flu-related deaths and activity is posted every Thursday at flu.nc.gov.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 15, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov 



Gov. Cooper Announces Applications Open for New Rent &

Utility Assistance Program

Governor and health officials urge continued vigilance as certain metrics rise

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper announced today that applications are now being accepted for the N.C. Housing Opportunities and Prevention of Evictions (HOPE) Program, which will assist eligible low- and- moderate-income renters experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19. The new program seeks to promote housing stability during the ongoing pandemic by providing rent and utility assistance to prevent evictions and utility disconnections.

“The spread of coronavirus has affected every aspect of our lives. Many have lost jobs, had work hours cut back or had to care for someone who has become ill with COVID-19,” said Governor Roy Cooper. “By creating this program to help with rent and utility bills, we can keep people in their homes where they will be safest during this pandemic.”

The HOPE Program will provide $117 million for rent and utility assistance for renters who have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, have a current household income that is 80 percent of the area median income or lower, and are behind on their rent or utilities when they apply. 

Renters who need rent or utility assistance can apply online at nc211.org/hope. Applicants who cannot access the online application can also call 2-1-1 and speak with a program representative, who will assist the caller through the application on the phone. Callers can reach 2-1-1 Monday-Friday between 7 am and 6 pm.

The HOPE Program is funded by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant−Coronavirus funds and U.S. Department of Treasury Coronavirus Relief funds, which have been provided to North Carolina. The funds are administered by the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency, a division of the Department of Public Safety, and will be distributed through community partner agencies across the state.

Renters can apply for utility assistance, rent assistance or both programs. Rent assistance is paid to the landlord on behalf of the applicant. This includes overdue and future rent payments, for up to six months. At least one month’s rent must be overdue at the time of application.

Utility payments will be made directly to the utility provider for up to six months of past due essential utilities, such as electricity, water, sewer/wastewater, natural gas and propane. For more information about the HOPE Program, visit nc211.org/hope.

Update on COVID-19 Key Metrics

DHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen also provided an update on North Carolina’s current COVID-19 key metrics and cautioned that people should continue to be vigilant and practice the 3 W’s to prevent the spread of the virus as the weather gets cooler this fall.

“We have the tools to slow the spread and protect one another. The science is clear on masks. They work. They slow the spread. Whatever your reason, I am asking you to get behind the mask,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D.  

Dr. Cohen reviewed the state’s key metrics:

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is increasing

Trajectory of Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of cases is increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive is increasing, but is lower than it was in July when we last had our highest rate of new cases.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations is increasing, but we still have capacity.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread in testing, tracing and prevention. Testing capacity continues to increase with upwards of 40,000 tests reported on peak days. We continue to hire contact tracers, and there have been more than 150,000 downloads of the NCDHHS exposure notification app, SlowCOVIDNC. North Carolina’s personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Read the slides from today's briefing.


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 21, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov 



Following the Data, North Carolina Will Remain Paused in Phase 3

Gov. Cooper & health officials urge North Carolinians to recommit to prevention efforts

 

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper announced today that North Carolina will remain paused in Phase 3 for three more weeks as health officials continue to monitor North Carolina’s viral trends. North Carolina has seen increased hospitalizations and trajectory of cases in recent weeks. Governor Cooper underscored the importance of wearing masks, social distancing, and using good judgment despite fatigue or frustration with the pandemic.

 “As this pandemic continues, I know it’s difficult and tiring to keep up our guard, especially when we’re gathered with people we love. But it’s necessary. No one wants to spread COVID-19 accidentally to friends or family, so we must keep prevention at the forefront,” said Governor Cooper. “Wearing a mask shows you care about people. Wearing a mask is an easy way to protect our communities and look out for each other. Confronting the virus head on and doing our part as individuals is good for our health and good for our economy.” 

Also today, Governor Cooper updated on progress with the NC Housing Opportunities and Prevention of Evictions (HOPE) program. Since Governor Cooper announced the (HOPE) Program last week, 12,000 eligible applicants have filed for assistance. The HOPE Program provides assistance to eligible low-and-moderate income renters experiencing financial hardship due to the pandemic by making direct payments to landlords and utility companies. People can apply for help by calling 2-1-1 or going to nc211.org/hope.

“As the number of applications climbs higher every day, it should make us remember that it’s more than a number. Every one of those applications represents a family having to make impossible choices between basic necessities during a global pandemic,” said Governor Cooper. 

Yesterday, Secretary of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen and Secretary of Department of Public Safety Erik Hooks sent a letter to local officials in communities with increased viral spread urging their continued action in fighting COVID-19 and suggesting additional measures to mitigate its spread. Read more about that letter here.

“We are doing everything we can to slow the spread of this virus. This simple fact is we can’t do it on our own. Ignoring the virus doesn’t make it go away – just the opposite,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D. “As hard as this is, it will end. We will get through this. Let’s do it by looking out for one another. Whatever your reason, get behind the mask.” 

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is level.

Trajectory of Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of cases is increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive is increasing but is lower than it was during the last time North Carolina’s cases were at their peak in July.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations is increasing.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread in testing, tracing and prevention.

Testing

  • Testing capacity is high.

Tracing Capability

  • The state is continuing to hire contact tracers to bolster the efforts of local health departments.
  • There have been almost 250,000 downloads of the exposure notification app, SlowCOVIDNC.

Personal Protective Equipment

  • North Carolina’s personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Read Executive Order 170.

Read the slides from today’s briefing.


 

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 14, 2020
Contact: Ford Porter
Phone: 919-814-2100
Email: govpress@nc.gov



North Carolina K-12 Public Schools to Require Key Safety Measures to

Allow In-person Instruction 

Districts may choose to conduct school entirely by remote learning

North Carolina will continue to pause in Safer At Home Phase 2 for three more weeks

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen were joined today by education and health leaders to announce health and safety plans for K-12 public schools for the new school year. Schools will open for in-person instruction under an updated Plan B that requires face coverings for all K-12 students, fewer children in the classroom, measures to ensure social distancing for everyone in the building, and other safety protocols. 

“The most important opening is that of our classroom doors. Our schools provide more than academics; they are vital to our children’s’ health, safety and emotional development,” said Governor Cooper. “This is a difficult time for families with hard choices on every side. I am committed to working together to ensure our students and educators are as safe as possible and that children have opportunities to learn in the way that is best for them and their families.” 

The Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit outlines the updated requirements for Plan B. Districts may choose to operate under Plan C, which calls for remote learning only, and health leaders recommend schools allow families to opt in to all-remote learning. Modifications have been made to Plan B since it was released in June to make it more protective of public health. 

“After looking at the current scientific evidence and weighing the risks and benefits, we have decided to move forward with today’s balanced, flexible approach which allows for in-person instruction as long as key safety requirements are in place in addition to remote learning options.” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, MD. “We will continue to follow the science and data and update recommendations as needed. We ask every North Carolinian to do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and follow the three W’s: Wear a face covering when in public, Wait 6 feet apart, Wash your hands.”

Governor Cooper also announced that the state will provide at least five reusable face coverings for every student, teacher and school staff member in public schools. In June, the state provided packs of personal protective equipment to schools that included a two-month supply of thermometers, surgical masks, face shields and gowns for school nurses and delegated staff who provide health care to students.

“Educators and stakeholders across our state have worked tirelessly to reopen our school buildings safely for our students, teachers and staff. Today, we take another critical step towards that goal. We also know families need to choose the option that is best for their children, so all school districts will provide remote learning options,” said Eric Davis, Chairman of the State Board of Education.

"In-person education is important for children, and it happens in the context of a community. This plan strikes the right balance between health and safety and the benefits of having children learn in the classroom. We must all continue with proven measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission like wearing a face covering, keeping distance between people, and frequent hand and surface cleanings so we can move closer to safely re-opening public schools," said Dr. Theresa Flynn, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, a practicing pediatrician who serves on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Pediatric Society and joined today’s announcement.

Under Plan B, schools are required to follow key safety measures that include:

  • Require face coverings for all teachers and students K-12
  • Limit the total number of students, staff and visitors within a school building to the extent necessary to ensure 6 feet distance can be maintained when students/staff will be stationary 
  • Conduct symptom screening, including temperature checks 
  • Establish a process and dedicated space for people who are ill to isolate and have transportation plans for ill students
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in the school and transportation vehicles regularly
  • Require frequent hand washing throughout the school day and provide hand sanitizer at entrances and in every classroom
  • Discontinue activities that bring together large groups 
  • Limit nonessential visitors and activities involving external groups 
  • Discontinue use of self-service food or beverage distribution 

In addition, schools are strongly recommended to follow additional safety measures that include:

  • Designate hallways and entrance/exit doors as one-way
  • Keep students and teachers in small groups that stay together as much as possible
  • Have meals delivered to the classroom or have students bring food back to the classroom if social distancing is not possible in the cafeteria
  • Discontinue activities that bring together large groups 
  • Place physical barriers such as plexiglass at reception desks and similar areas

More details can be found in the Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit. Read the Screening Reference Guide for schools and the Infection Control and PPE Guidance.

In addition to the announcement about school plans, Governor Cooper shared that North Carolina will remain paused in Safer At Home Phase 2 after the current Executive Order expires on Friday, July 17. 

“As we continue to see rising case numbers and hospitalizations, we will stay in Safer At Home Phase 2 for three more weeks,” said Governor Cooper. “Our re-opening priority is the school building doors, and in order for that to happen we have to work to stabilize our virus trends.”

School Groups on Today’s Public School Announcement

“While all school re-entry plans have their challenges during this pandemic, our superintendents, principals, and other school leaders will continue to prioritize student and staff safety in reopening schools under the cautious parameters outlined today by the Governor,” said North Carolina Association of School Administrators Executive Director Katherine Joyce. “We look forward to continuing work with the Governor, the General Assembly, and other state leaders to ensure our schools have the support needed to get student learning back on track in the safest manner possible in each local district.”

“I recognize Governor Cooper faced a very difficult decision. The good news is that local school boards can now begin to officially put their school reopening plans in motion,” said Brenda Stephens, President of the North Carolina School Board Association. “While the current situation may not be ideal for all, I’m confident North Carolina’s educators will continue to provide students with the best education possible.

 


 

Count On Me NC

𝗔𝘀 𝗡𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗮𝗿𝗼𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗮’𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘂𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘀, 𝗵𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗹𝘀, 𝗮𝘁𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗯𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗼𝗽𝗲𝗻 𝗮𝗳𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗖𝗢𝗩𝗜𝗗-𝟭𝟵 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘆-𝗮𝘁-𝗵𝗼𝗺𝗲 𝗼𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗿, 𝗖𝗼𝘂𝗻𝘁 𝗢𝗻 𝗠𝗲 𝗡𝗖 𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗺𝘂𝘁𝘂𝗮𝗹 𝗽𝗹𝗲𝗱𝗴𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝘂𝗯𝗹𝗶𝗰 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗮𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗲𝗺𝗽𝗼𝘄𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝗴𝘂𝗲𝘀𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗯𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽 𝗸𝗲𝗲𝗽 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝘀𝗮𝗳𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱.

Go check out the website https://countonmenc.org/

  • make a pledge as a customer/community member
  • complete provided online training as a business, and receive a certificate of completion to show your community!

 


 

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) is available online

These are stressful times for parents and caregivers, with so many normal routines affected--jobs interrupted, schools closed, businesses closed or services severely limited.  These stressors can adversely affect parent/child interactions. 

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) Online is available to all NC parents free of charge.  It provides resources for parents and caregivers who are parenting during stressful times.  Any parent can access Triple P Online at the following webpage: https://www.triplep-parenting.com/nc-en/triple-p/ [triplep-parenting.com].


 

NC 2-1-1 is now a resource for people to call for assistance related to the COVID-19 coronavirus

NC 2-1-1 [click.icptrack.com] is an information and referral service that families and individuals can call to obtain free and confidential information on health and human services resources within their community. NC 2-1-1 operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and resources are available in most languages.

“Services like NC 2-1-1 are critical during times of emergency,” said Governor Cooper. “North Carolinians can now call 2-1-1 to get the information they need while we continue working together to prevent the spread of this virus.”

North Carolinians can text COVIDNC to 898211 to receive general information and updates about COVID-19. Sign up now to get regular alerts on the rapidly evolving situation and North Carolina’s response.

NC 2-1-1 can refer callers to the organizations in their local community best equipped to address their specific health and human services needs including food, shelter, energy assistance, housing, parenting resources, health care, employment, substance abuse treatment, as well as specific resources for older adults and for persons with disabilities, and much more. Simply dial 2-1-1 or TTY 888-892-1162 for assistance.

NC 2-1-1 cannot provide direct medical services, and COVID-19 can only be diagnosed by a health care professional. If you suspect you or someone you care for may have symptoms or have been exposed to the virus, you should contact your health care provider. If you do not have a provider, you can call your local health department [click.icptrack.com], free and charitable clinics or a Federally Qualified Health Clinic [click.icptrack.com] for guidance.

People should only call 9-1-1 if they are experiencing an emergency. 9-1-1 centers across North Carolina have been receiving general questions and other non-emergency calls related to COVID-19. Please do not call 9-1-1 unless you have an emergency.

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19 in North Carolina, go to ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus [click.icptrack.com].

Due to anticipated high call volume, those seeking general information about COVID-19 are strongly encouraged to sign up for texts. People who are trying to locate specific services would benefit by calling. To learn more about NC 2-1-1, visit nc211.org [click.icptrack.com].

 


 

Health Department now offering an additional Child Health Clinic on Tuesday mornings starting March 3, 2020

 

 


 

WIC Self-referral Form

WIC is the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. It is commonly referred to as the WIC Program. Greene County Department of Public Health provides WIC Program services. WIC provides nutrition education, breastfeeding support, healthy food, health referrals and other services free of charge to North Carolina families who qualify. The WIC Program promotes healthy habits and healthy families to pregnant, breastfeeding and postpartum women, infants and children until age 5. By filling out this WIC Self-referral form, our WIC program will contact you!

https://www.nutritionnc.com/wic/wic-referral.asp


 


2019 State of the County Health Report

Greene County Department of Public Health is pleased to share the 2019 State of the County Health (SOTCH) Report. This report provides an annual review of the health of our community, tracks progress regarding health priorities and concerns, and identifies new initiatives and emerging issues that affect the health status of Greene County residents.  The information is designed to educate and update community members, community leaders, elected officials and local agencies.  Click here to view the 2019 SOTCH Report.

For more information about how public health is working for you, feel free to contact Joy S. Brock by phone (252) 747-8183 or email joy.brock@greenecountync.gov

County residents are also encouraged to attend regular meetings of the Greene County Board of Health to learn more about public health in the county.  The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Health is Tuesday, November 10, 2020 at 7 p.m. at the Greene County Senior Center.

 


2018 Community Health Needs Assessment 

The Community Health Needs Assessment process is a four‐year cycle in which local health departments across North Carolina are charged with the responsibility of conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) in their respective counties. The CHNA is required of public health departments in the consolidated agreement between the North Carolina Division of Public Health and the local public health agency. Furthermore, a CHNA is required for local public health department accreditation through the NC Local Health Department Accreditation Board (G.S. § 130A-34.1).

Community Health Needs Assessments are the foundation for improving and promoting the health of the community. The role of the assessment is to identify factors that affect the health of a population and determine the availability of resources within the community to adequately address those issues. The completed CHNA serves as the basis for prioritizing the community’s health needs and culminates in planning to meet those needs.

To view the 2018 Community Health Needs Assessment for Greene County, please click here.


 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
To view the complete Non-Discrimination Statement in English and Spanish, please click here.

 


For more information regarding public health issues or health department services, contact Joy S. Brock at (252) 747-8183 or joy.brock@greenecountync.gov.